News & Events

NFWF awards $2.2 million in grants to improve the health of the Delaware River watershed

WASHINGTON, D.C. (August 27, 2018) – The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) today announced 13 grant awards totaling $2.2 million for water quality restoration and habitat conservation in targeted regions throughout the Delaware River watershed. Grantee organizations have committed $3.5 million in match, generating a total conservation impact of more than $5.7 million.   The grants announced today were awarded to projects in New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania. In total, the projects will improve 4,575 acres of forest habitat, treat polluted runoff using agricultural conservation practices on nearly 7,790 acres, prevent 11.25 million gallons of unfiltered stormwater from
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NABCI’s Bird Conservation Relevancy Toolkit- helping partners build broad and diverse relationships

August 28, 2018 – by Judith Scarl, NABCI Coordinator – Today I am excited to share NABCI’s new Relevancy Toolkit, a resource designed to facilitate conversations between the bird-focused community and other partners whose broad goals may align with bird conservation outcomes.  Since actions and outcomes that benefit birds can also have far-reaching benefits for human health, economic interests, and other human goals, engaging a broad community to work towards common goals can ensure we have the capacity and buy-in to tackle complex conservation challenges.  Many of us collaborate with diverse groups such as private landowners, agricultural organizations, industry, land
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Senate introduces “Recovering America’s Wildlife Act” to boost funding to state wildlife agencies

WASHINGTON, DC – July 17, 2018 – The Alliance for America’s Fish & Wildlife is excited to see introduction of the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act (S.3223) in the United States Senate today. Senators James Risch (R-ID) and Joe Manchin (D-WV) along with their colleagues Lamar Alexander (R-TN), and Heidi Heitkamp (D-ND) introduced bipartisan legislation that recommends funding for conservation of those fish and wildlife species in greatest need across the country. S.3223 recommends that Congress authorize $1.3 billion annually from energy development on federal lands and waters to the existing Wildlife Conservation Restoration Program to conserve the full array of
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USDA Releases Five-Year Strategy to Improve Forest Health in Appalachia

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) today released a new five-year conservation strategy to support private landowners managing for healthier forests in the Appalachian Mountains, part of an ongoing effort to help the golden-winged warbler rebound, and avoid the need for regulation of the species. This strategy serves as a game plan for how USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) and its conservation partners can best meet their goal of helping landowners adopt bird-friendly practices on more than 15,000 acres of young forests and shrublands over the next five years. The golden-winged warbler has suffered one of the steepest population declines of
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Farm Bill Works for Landowners and Birds, New Report Finds

State of the Birds 2017 Identifies Benefits for Agriculture, Forestry, and Conservation (Washington, D.C., August 3, 2017) Thirty-seven million. That’s the increase in the number of waterfowl in the Prairie Pothole Region over the past quarter-century, thanks to the Farm Bill. The State of the Birds 2017 report, released today by the North American Bird Conservation Initiative (NABCI), documents the many benefits the Farm Bill—America’s single largest source of conservation funding for private lands—has delivered to birds, farmers, and rural communities. For more than three decades, the Farm Bill has been an effective tool for wildlife conservation, sustaining essential habitat for
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Research Calls for Enhancing Long-term Benefits of Farm Bill Programs

Many farmers, ranchers, and landowners rely on voluntary conservation incentive programs within the Farm Bill to make improvements to their land and operations that benefit them, the environment, and society. According to a recent study by researchers from Virginia Tech’s College of Natural Resources and Environment and Point Blue Conservation Science published in the scientific journal Conservation Letters, it is necessary to find ways to sustain the benefits from these practices after the incentive program ends. This finding is crucial as Congress discusses the reauthorization of the Farm Bill. In the United States, federal incentive programs aimed at promoting private land
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